• Meg Sechrest

Interview with Author Christian Freed


When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

C. Freed: Oh, I suppose you could say it has always been in my blood, from making goofy comics as a kid, winning an award in school for a really bad novel, to dreams of being the next Tolkien. It wasn’t until I was getting ready to retire from a career in the US Army that I decided I really wanted to make a go for it.


How long does it take you to write a book?

C. Freed: That depends entirely on the type of book. I like big, sweeping epics that range around 150k words so it takes time, especially for a series. Shorter books take me a few months- whereas they used to take most of the year.


What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

C. Freed: I try to make my books (mainly military sci-fi and fantasy) as close to realistic as possible. Nothing ruins a good story more than seeing the creator have zero concept of tactics or strategy. Take the Lord of the Rings movies. They look amazing and I love watching them, but Peter Jackson has no idea how to fight a battle and it shows from the massive waste of lives in every scene.


How do your books get published?

C. Freed: I have been on a whirlwind over the past decade. I started on my own with two titles, got picked up by two small publishers. One went under and I eventually fired the other. Then I went to Lulu, then Amazon, decided Amazon didn’t deserve to make more off my books than I do, and started my own imprint called Warfighter Books through IngramSpark. Now I am getting into bookstores, libraries, and more.


Where do you find inspiration?

C. Freed: Everywhere. I am a military historian, combat veteran, and have been around for a few decades now. I draw inspiration from everything I can. If it works and I can fit it into the story I use it. If not, oh well.


When did you write your first book and how old were you?

C. Freed: I wrote a nasty horror novel back in 10th grade, oh about 30 years ago now. It wasn’t until the mid 90s that I evolved to my first adult novel, which was, ironically, my last published.


What do you like to do when you’re not writing?

C. Freed: I have three Bernese Mountain Dogs so they take a lot of time and energy. We are always down in the woods. Other than that, the kids are grown and out of the house so I like a quiet afternoon with a great cigar and even better bourbon.


What does your family think of your writing? Who is your biggest supporter?

C. Freed: I learned not to ask my wife to read any of my work, but she is hands down my biggest supporter. Especially through those rare moments where I feel down on myself- which are very. Very rare. My family is all for it and I come from a writing bloodline. One of my uncles is a historian and author who has had several bestselling books.


How many books have you writing? Which is your favorite?

C. Freed: I currently have 26 completely titles, most of them are published. I also have 3 in development and about another 20 ideas themed out. Favorites? How can you ask that??? Seriously though, I am one of those people who don’t have many favorites. If am being forced to choose, it would be Dreams of Winter and the Forgotten Gods Tales series. Consider it my opus.


What is one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

C. Freed: I would have to say just how deep the human imagination can stretch. It is truly an amazing thing. The only limits you have are those you place on yourself.


Do you have any suggestions to help future/aspiring writers? If so, what are they?

C. Freed: My one bit of advice is for new authors to treat it like a business. If you are serious about becoming an author you have to. Otherwise you will be like these sad people on social media complaining about not getting noticed and not having any sales. What’s the point? Do your research, make it work, and follow what the traditional publishers are doing. There’s a reason books are successful.


Do you hear from your readers much? What kind of things do they say?

C. Freed: I never used to but now that things are aligning for me I am hearing more and more. Most is positive feedback and requests for the next book. Occasionally there is the negative one, but that comes with the job, right?


What do you think makes a good story?

C. Freed: Tension. I remember watching John Carpenter’s In the Mouth of Madness and was on edge for the whole flick. That is what keeps me turning pages and, if I can pull it off, makes my readers come back for more.


How did you get the idea for your last book?

C. Freed: As a veteran of Afghanistan I used the Afghan mountain tribes, the Syrian civil war, an advanced military culture, and a little gunpowder tech to create a world of monsters, armies, political backstabbing, and desperate people just trying to get home.


Thanks to Christian Freed for taking the time for this interview! It's always nice to hear from other authors!

You can learn more about Christian and explore his titles here:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChristianFreed

Insta: www.instagram.com/christianwarrenfreed

Website: https://christianwfreed.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8137590.Christian_Warren_Freed

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 © Meg Sechrest 2020

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